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Monday, December 7, 2009

A Wolf in Wolf's Clothing by Deborah MacGillivray



A Wolf in Wolf's Clothing by Deborah MacGillivray
Publisher: Dorchester Publishing
Genre: Contemporary
Length: Full (303 pages)
Heat: Sensual
Rating: 5 Books
Reviewed by Honeysuckle

Revenge—that was Trev’s goal when he first set his sights on Raven. And a delicious revenge it would be. He and his two brothers had each selected a Montgomerie sister to systematically seduce and destroy, and this quiet granddaughter of his enemy was perfect. She lived simply in a cottage in the English countryside, a painter, and socialized only with gypsies and a menagerie of misfits: her fat orange tabby, her one-legged seagull and midget pony. And in addition to beauty, Raven had a delicious vulnerability begging to be exploited. Trev was happy to oblige. In fact, it felt like destiny.

Magic and fate have brought a self-proclaimed wolf to Colford Hall. He’s dressed in a designer suit, drives a Lamborghini MurciĆ©lago and apologizes for nothing. And though Trev doesn’t realize it, wolves mate for life.

This is the third book in Deborah MacGillivray's Sisters of Colford Hall Series and it is an enchanting read. The characters are so well depicted they become a part of you as you read this light comedy mixed with emotional drama. You will cry one minute, laugh the next. There is, of course, the usual cat that always graces her books, along with a quirky animal menagerie. A one-legged seagull who is the bane of the hero is just one example.

The story begins with an determined Trevelyn Merchan [disguised as Trevelyn Sinclair] out to destroy the Montgomerie family empire by using Raven, a beautiful and reclusive artist. He finds it easier said than done when he begins to fall in love with the beauty.

Raven, however, is fighting hard to keep her own attraction at bay—a self-protective shield kicking in despite the handsome hero's charms. Charms which even her wary family appear to fall for.

The convoluted but heavenly tale of love and laughter is conveyed with indisputable flair, something I've come to expect from Deborah MacGillivray.

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